Edenvale vet comes to wildebeest calf’s rescue

Dr Shabeer Bhoola, holding the two-day-old Black Wildebeest calf which he helped treat on January 24.

Edenvale veterinarian Doctor Shabeer Bhoola, of the Terrace Road Veterinary Hospital, could hardly believe his ears when he was told a young Black Wildebeest was in the parking lot waiting for treatment.

Dr Shabeer said despite assisting a number of exotic animals over the years, being told a Wildebeest was awaiting treatment was a bit of a shock.

“I almost did not believe it,” said Dr Shabeer.

Dr Shabeer said the young Black Wildebeest was only two days old when it was brought to him on January 24.

He said the calf still had its umbilical cord attached to it.

“One of the grounds keepers cutting the grass at the Modderfontein Reserve noticed the young calf lying in the grass,” said Dr Shabeer.

Dr Shabeer said the calf could not walk and was very weak at the time it was brought to the hospital.

Once the Wildebeest calf had been brought to the vet, Dr Shabeer said the initial analysis of the calf showed that the animal was extremely dehydrated.

“The calf’s glucose levels were at zero and its body temperature was very low,” said Dr Shabeer.

He said the calf soon stabilised after receiving fluids and some warmth at the veterinary hospital.

Dr Shabeer said at first he felt out of his depth while helping a young Wildebeest but it did not stop him.

He said over the years the Terrace Road Vet has built a good relationship with the Wildlife in Crisis group and was able to get assistance from them.

Ms Judy Davidson from Wildlife in Crisis said Dr Shabeer contacted the rehabilitation centre for additional assistance.

“We fed the calf some colostrum at our facility as it was very young,” said Judy.

She said on the same day the young calf was returned to the reserve to be reunited with its herd.

“The calf was only with us for four hours,” said Judy.

Judy said the calf was reunited with the herd on January 25.

“Dealing with wild or exotic animals is not as uncommon as everyone believes,” said Dr Shabeer.

He said before the Greenstone area was developed there was an expanse of space for wildlife.

Dr Shabeer said over the years he has helped Dassie’s, Meerkats, a variety of indigenous birds and Servals.

Dr Shabeer urged community members to be more aware of the indigenous wildlife in the area.

He said as one of the few veterinary hospitals with the correct permits to treat indigenous animals, the Terrace Road Veterinary Hospital can be called first for the treatment of an indigenous/wild animal.

 

  AUTHOR
Stephan Lehman

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